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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 94 (some duplicates have been removed)
warning those workers. here's the federal law and what it says. it says that companies with 100 or more workers must provide 60 days notice before mass layoffs or plant closings, or those workers can get up to 60 days of back pay if they are not notified. the republicans are crying foul and eamon javers picks under the story. >> reporter: here's what the omb said in late september -- it is neither necessary or appropriate for federal contractors to provide warn act notice to employees 60 days in advance of the potential sequestration because of the uncertainty about whether sequestration will occur. i've toualked to employees at t white house and omb about this question. their idea is this -- first of all, there's uncertainty about the fiscal cliff itself, whether it is actually going to happen or not. they say that the warn act is only required for those planning specific cutbacks and specific plant closings and they say since the employers in this case federal contractors don't know that sequestration is going to happen, therefore they don't have any specific information. and also the
. the law states that the federal government will only recognize traditional marriages, meaning no federal benefits even where same-sex marriage is legal. >> same-sex couples are denied hundreds of different rights and benefits that are provided to married different-sex couples under federal law. >> reporter: on the document as well, whether to curtail parts of the historic voting rights act of 1965. it mandates federal oversight for states with a history of voting discrimination when changing any rules for elections. challengers say the law is outdated and unnecessary. a big lineup of cases that could change the landscape of civil rights in america. francis coe, nbc news. >>> here is a look at other stories making news early today in america. in maine a group of strangers spring into action when an elderly woman drove her car into the portland harbor. the ban of good samaritans pulled the 84-year-old out of her car moments before it sank. the woman is in stable condition. some of the rescuers had to be treated for hypothermia. >>> karma geddon two has come to an end just for the end of th
a revolution has led to the transfer of power. >> i expect improvements and laws so that children will be happy. i don't know how he will behave and what he will do for the people, but i see the people are hopeful. >> we expect things to get better. expect new things. the whole population is in a good mood. people meet each other and kiss each other. >> he swept to power in 2004 but faces accusations of but the rates vary and rule. his party will no longer control parliament. >> it is clear that george and dreamliner it has secured a majority. this means they will form the next government and i come as the president, with the framework of the constitution will assist the process. >> the georgian dream alliance is led by billionaire tycoon, bidzina ivanishvili. he campaigned on a pro-moscow ticket but wants to move closer to the european union as well. he says his coalition deserves to win. >> we made the best choices and collected the best coalition. the result is no coincidence. >> a new law that takes effect next year will transfer some powers from the president to the prime minister. >> let'
reform law took effect today. hospitals will face big fines if too many of their medicare patients have to be readmitted lookse of complications. we asked anna werner to look into this. >> reporter: so this is everything you have to take? >> yes. >> reporter: 84-year-old phil eckloff suffers from congestive heart failure and diabetes and wound up in the hospital twice ais year. l twice a laundry list of follow-up instructions and fedications. so you have to deal with all this stuff. this is a lot of-- a lot of medications. a lot to remember. >> yeah, it is. >> reporter: eckloff is fortunate. f isas a home health care worker to help him. what do you think it would be like for you if you had to keep y with all this by yourself? >> if you don't take a service like this you'll end up become you'llhospital. and that's true. >> reporter: federal officials ere concerned that many medicare patients fail to get the necessary follow-up care and end up being readmitted to the hospital, often in the same tnth. so the government is now penalizing hospitals for excessive readmissions in three areas:
there is a law that says it is on the books and you eliminate that right, and it gets this heightened scrutiny. there seems to be no reason for that except for the class of people that you are removing from this. it makes a difference. the right was there after the court found it after this whole history of the citizens having passed referendum to block it in the courts. that is not matter if it was there for a year or a day. that is not an equal protection violation. anything you can never take it a way. he says it is not a one-way ratchet. engine cannot take it away. that really only applies to the situation in california. the supreme court has not made its call. possible they will take it to shoot them down. if they approve it, and they probably would let it stands. it is such a quirky opinion that it will not have that brought up an effect. the ninth circuit is not viewed by others as a very controlling kind of precedence. there is an arguably controlling pace. it is a summary of a similar challenge to minnesota laws. the courts really gave this and did not consider it. the supreme court m
role. john coffee, a law professor at columbia university, joins us via skype this morning with his legal insights. good morning and good to have you on the show. > > good morning to you. pleasure to be here. > > is it difficult for investors to get these cases to court? > > it's not difficult in the context of an ipo. there's probably no other legal context where the balance or the advantage is tipped as sharply in the favor of the plaintiffs as in the world of ipos and other registered securities offerings. > > i spoke with one attorney going to bat for clients against facebook. he says the case is stuck in procedure. is that the norm? > > the norm is that there's an awful lot of organization in the case. a case doesn't get started right away until one team of plaintiffs gets control of the litigation. then the next thing that will happen is that the defendants will make a motion to dismiss. that's the really critical motion, because typically if the defendants cannot get the action dismissed at the outset, then we're likely to get into settlement negotiations, which may take a ye
responsible foremaning the two vessels has not exercised the care required of them by law to ensure the safety of the vessel that they are navigating as well as the people on board their vessels. >> the hong kong government has set up a special panel to speed up the investigation. >>> the philippines and vietnam have appealed to the international community for a peaceful and legal resolution to the south china sea issue. china wasn't mentioned by name in their speeches to the u.n. general assembly. even so, both countries were clearly calling for support as they resist thepreading influence of asia's rising power. the secretary of foreign affairs rosario urged the countries to quickly agree on a legally binding code of conduct to ease tensions. >> to address this challenge and arrive at a resolution, we must rely on the rule of law and not the force of arms. we must rely on the body of rules that state that disputes must be resolved peacefully. >> vietnam's deputy minister of foreign affairs resisted china's demands that the disputes be resolved through bilateral negotiations and called on the
people and informing them about changes in voting laws while allies of ours are fighting voter suppression laws in the courts in states across the nation. >> jennifer: right. we're going to talk about that in one second. true the vote of course for ow viewers is an entity that's been supported by a lot of the right wing organizations that we have fought on this show, including the koch brothers and others funded by some of the entities that want to limit access to the ballot by voters they think are not favorable to republicans. the national urban league policy institute has actually found that african-american voters in a number of key states hold the key to the outcome of the 2012 election. tell us about that. >> governor, we achieved, as a nation, something remarkable in 2008. we achieved turnout parity meaning whites and african-americans turned out at the very same percentage level. a flippage in that turnout parity, if you will, a lower african-american turnout in states like ohio, virginia, and the state of
being investigated by law enforcement. it's quite a story. >>> it's actually going be a little quiet for the next few days on the campaign trail. that's because they have something else to work on. here's senior political editor paul steinhauser. >> reporter: hey, good morning, gary. it's pretty obvious. one event will definitely dominate the white house. >> i'm looking forward to the debates r the first comes on wednesday night when they face off in denver. both candidates have a lot on the line, especially the gop challenger who a few days ago gave some insight into his debate preps. >> it's great to have senator rob portman. you know, he debates me now from time to time. he's playing barack obama in these mock debates we have. i don't like him very much anymore, all right? he keeps on beating me up and i keep going away shaking my head. >> reporter: he flies to colorado on monday night, hun r hunkering down while making final preparations. then he goes to nevada and then goes behind closed doors before debate day. meanwhile both presidential campaigns play the expectations games,
's assume a new set of laws is passed. as quickly as they are passed, election lawyers figure out how to get around them. it is remarkable. it's constantly evolve issue. would i support moving the money back to the candidates. absolutely. i think there has to be a mechanism i worked for two millionaire politicians. i believe there should be a mechanism for rank and file. to be able to raise larger amounts. but i believe putting the money back in the candidate account create more accountability and much more integrity driven process to frame an election. me personally yes. and, you know, does my firm make money off the kinds of campaign. absolutely. from my perspective i think it's better for the country if we went back to that model. >> can i answer? >> i don't know that i agree with the assumption of the question. if you look at what -- [inaudible] look at what super pac actually do and what the advertising does, everyone in here age lot of people in the political times remember the question in political times 101 should the elected representative do what he believes is right or what the co
when we come to the weather in a few minutes. >>> fire heavily damaged the law office of the vallejo mayor davis is being investigated as arson. police say an that this data by a disgruntled client of either the mayor or his blog partner with its arsonists as the kremlin as the mayor this year. earlier his motorcycle was stolen from city hall. police are looking into the possibility of domestic terrorism. >>> because of the high-profile nature of who is involved we're characterizing it as a form of domestic terrorism that way we can bring in subject matter experts such as the fbi to utilize resources that this organization may not have. >>> so far off >>> if you remember the killing of the show prosecutors say that giselle kill the 26 to lustrous in a lot of was that she believed she ruined the relationship with her boyfriend she disappeared from a parking structure from hayward kaiser last may and a body was found months later at a remote area between pleasanton and sonora. governor brown has vetoed a bill that requires agencies to require a court order before disrupting self-ser
is also facing numerous challengeses. the law states the federal government will only recognize traditional marriages, meaning no federal benefits even where same-sex marriage is legal. >> same-sex couples are denied hundreds of different rights and benefits that are provided to married different sex couples under federal law. >> reporter: on the docket as well, whether to curtail parts of the historic voting rights act of 1965. it mandates federal oversight for states with a history of voting discrimination, when changing any rules for elections. challengers say the law is outdated and unnecessary. a big lineup of cases that could change the landscape of civil rights in america. fr frances coe, nbc news. >>> and now here's a look at some other stories making news early today in america. in maine, a group of strangers spring into action when an elderly woman drove her car into the portland harbor. the band of good samaritans pulled the 84-year-old out of her car moments before it sank. the woman is in stable condition. some of the rescuers had to be treated for hypothermia. >>>
now of the right is because of a law for the greece, under greek law, whatever party comes in first, i will take a step back. it has proportional representation. that the reserves a rule of comment. you should have the same percentage of delegates in congress that write the law. 18% of the people while party a, and it will come to deciding what laws get passed. they will effectively screwed that in which you would think of the idea. in european countries, we have torsional representation. you get a cut off of 5%. that is how many seats that you get. if you get 51% of the vote, you get it all and the 49% worked. by the way, we have had proportional representation in the united states in the past, and even have it now. when you read about a primary and the vote in some states, and candidate a gets another delegate conventions, that is a proportional representation and they get an equal number of delegates than what they got out of the vote. we actually recognize in the united states proportional representation, we just don't allow these days. one of the reasons for that, if i can be allo
third-quarter, mandated by the dodd-frank law, the senate will keep doing this for now on. first time they have done so. third quarter of 2010, july 22, it really is returned to normalcy, so to speak at the discount window. the biggest transaction is not tens of billions of dollars anymore, really the worst being $70 million transaction on august 6, 2010. some other banks in the tens of millions of dollars, but that is about it. the discount window giving a return to normalcy. connell: rich edson therefore imac therefore us in washington, d.c. i told him, never mind. dagen: an inside thing between you two dorks. the latest fox news poll showing president obama leading republican nominee mitt romney, but who do americans trust to better manage their taxes? connell: and already guaranteed a recession. says you have to buy gold. wait a minute, faber coming up. and look at the currencies everywhere against the dollar, we will be right back on "markets now." look, if you have copd like me, you know it can be hard to breathe, and how that feels. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysem
or fast and furious, but they found more stuff that he's done under the law to maximize profits and minimize taxes. they got him ted dead to rights again. i don't know if any american cares. do you remember how the kennedys made their money? >> i think there was some boot legging. >> might have been a little boot legging. john kerry married and then left his yacht in providence or something, didn't he. and then john edwards flipping his magnetic business card at all the ambulances going by made $80 million. it's weird, isn't it? >> he was a good lawyer. >> and a hell of a human being, too, johnny. we have ten seconds. >> i don't think additional incremental disclosures about offshore investments will make a big deal. >> all right, my friend, thank you. >>> when we come back, we'll get to kevin ferry from the cme, we'll find out what's most likely to drive action on the second day of the quarter. smart comes with 8 airbags, 3 a crash management system and the world's only tridion safety cell which can withstand over three and a half tons. small in size. big on safety. monarch of
about what treatments are given. that's explicitly prohibited in the law. but let's go back to what governor romney indicated that under his plan he would be able to cover people with preexisting conditions. well actually, governor, that isn't what your plan does. what your plan does is to duplicate what's already the law which says if you are out of health insurance for three months than you can end up getting continuous coverage and an insurance company can't deny you if it's been under 90 days. but that's already the law. and that doesn't help the millions of people out there with preexisting conditions there's a why reason governor romney set up the plan that he did in massachusetts. it wasn't a government takeover of health care, it was the largest expansion of private insurance. but what it does say is that insurers, you've got to take everybody. now, that also means that you've got more customers. but when governor romney says he'll replace it with something but can't detail how it will be, in fact, replaced and the reason he set up the system he did in massachusetts was beca
is used everyday by t.s.a. officers, border agents and state, local, and federal law enforcements. >> if you're speeding, you get pulled over, they're query that name. and if they're encountering a known or suspected terrorist it will pop up and say "call the terrorist screening center." >> reporter: how often do these encounters happen? >> we're averaging about 55 encounters with known or suspected terrorists every single day. >> reporter: in most cases, the encounters do not produce arrest but provide additional intelligence. >> location of where the guy is going, what he's doing, additional associates that the subject is hanging around. >> reporter: names are frequently added and subtracted, always in secret. healy also overseas the even more critical no-fly list. there are 20,000 people on the no-fly list. about 700 of them are americans. so there are people who live in this country who you have enough concerns about they can't fly? >> yes. >> reporter: the databases are not perfect. some innocent people have been kept off airplanes by mistake. and one person who never made th
signature healthcare law is more popular than it has been in years, according to a new survey. september's kaiser health tracking poll had mostly good news for obama, but this was tempered by one finding, that two in three seniors believe the healthcare law directly cuts medicare benefits. a frequent attack line from romney, the cuts claim points to the law's $716 billion in reductions to medicare provider payments. overall, the poll found that 45% of u.s. adults have a favorable view of the healthcare law, while 40% have an unfavorable view. and here's the front page of the "boston globe" this morning, this owe lit wary is in a lot of papers, but john silver, boston university leader, dies. his temp he is oust quarter century as president of boston university brought the school to new levels of academic excellence and financial stability while creating an atmosphere of conflict and controversy, and who, in 1990, came within 77,000 votes of becoming governor of massachusetts, died of kidney failure on thursday in his brookline home. he was 86 years old. last call in this first segment of
ways to reduce the number of abortions. we got to think about why our law enforcement community --our working mothers are in trouble. we have to get free natal care for them. have too many children coming into kindergarten behind, and if we lose them in kindergarten, we lose them for ever. 2500 kids in a program here in omaha that are provided refuge that are being sexually abused in their own home. we got to pay attention to them, and we got to help them and the moms and the community leaders who are trying to help this problem. i do not think we should regulate women in making these decisions. it does not stop there. there is lots more that needs to make sure that that children have a fair and decent opportunity to live to their full potential. >> i am pro life. i believe in the sanctity of life. i believe there should be an exception made for the life of the mother. what we are looking at is an economy that is hurting families. we're looking at an economy that tends to hurt women more. the situation we're in the last four years, it is hurting women. women are not able to find jobs.
by law. its members were appointed by the prime minister. also, some members include a former ambassador to the united nations and a seismologist as well as experts in the field of nuclear energy and radiation. >> will this be enough to guarantee the nra's independence? >> not really. the nra is now under the umbrella of the environment ministry. this means politicians and bureaucrats will still have influence because they control the agency's budget. and that issue is a composition of the nra's task. more than 80% of its employees come from previous regulatory bodies. to prevent conflicts of interest, the government says nra employees will be prohibited from moving or returning to the ministry of industry. the government unit that promoted nuclear energy that critics are already finding loopholes in this. >> what challenges will the nra be facing over the coming months? >> there's a long list. without doubt, the most important and immediate challenge is redefining nuclear safety regulations. new standards will have to take into account the latest findings and technological advances to m
the government, a stage that's defined by law. its five members were appointed by the prime minister. also, some members include a former ambassador to the united nations and a seismologist as well as experts in the field of nuclear energy and radiation. >> will this be enough to guarantee the nra's independence? >> not really. the nra is now under the umbrella of the environment ministry. this means politicians and bureaucrats will still have influence because they control the agency's budget. another issue is a composition of the nra's task. more than 80% of its employees come from previous regulatory bodies. to prevent conflictsf interest, the government says nra employees will be prohibited from moving or returning to the ministry of industry. the government unit that promoted nuclear energy, but critics are already finding loopholes in this. >> what challenges will the nra be facing over the coming months? >> there's a long list. without doubt, the most important and immediate challenge is redefining nuclear safety regulations. new standards will have to take into account the latest finding
at home, there was martial law and millions lived in poverty. her shoes may be worse for wear but i imelda herself is still going strong. aged 83, she has a seat in congress, and her family remains an important force in philippine politics. i imelda may outlive her shoes, but the legacy surrounding them is still very much intact. >> you're watching g.m.t. from "bbc world news." here are the headlines. kenyan and somalia troops enter the lost major stronghold in the port of kismayo. chinese state media say the fall of bo xilai is to be expelled from the communist party and will face prosecution. 19 people have been killed in a plane crash on the outskirts of nepal. a place spokesperson said the small aircraft caught fire within two minutes of taking off. the plane was flying near mount everest. alexander mchenry reports. >> engulfed in flames, the plane came down minutes after the takeoff, just over a mile from the airport. it crashed into a river bank and caught fire. onlookers were shocked by what they saw. this eyewitness said the flames were high and burnt all parts of the plane. there
the song came as a shock. when i got at the record i gave it to my mother-in-law. she said [indiscernible] . >> he was no longer in charge. this man had taken over. it was a moment in pop history , but dealings were mixed in liverpool. part i remember feeling, how long will this last? we all knew this was a big thing. gone.nths later, it's ♪ ♪ >> for a 15-year-old singer it would never be the same again. after this came the madness. >> i'm from liverpool pant i used to sing 60 years ago -- and i used to sing 60 years ago. [indiscernible] it was beatlemania. >> tony barrow was asked to write a press release for the beatles. >> i said, yes. >> the sales, even though it made it to number one locally,. or disappointments >> what happened was people like the fans thinking if we've purchased this single, the beatles will be off to london and we don't want to do that, if we want to keep the beatles right here. >> its a great beginning of the beatles story in pop history, but something special here had come to an end. bbc news, liverpool. >> liverpool's loss was everyone else's gain. let me r
think it is an invasion of privacy? >> the law in francis specific -- france is specific. >> you wonder why they took the risk. >> because then you can talk about it. otherwise they would not care. if nobody was buying or looking, they would not take the pictures. >> it is difficult to embrace success as a french woman. is it friends to celebrate success? >> that is quite true. in a way. but recently i have observed there were successful actors and directors and may have been embraced. but maybe when you have success, it might be more difficult. i do not now. thank you very much. >> that is all from all of us. goodbye. >> makes sense of international news at bbc.com/news. funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers offers specialized solutions to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> bbc news was presented by
of this type of information under the dodd-frank law. we first reported tens of billions of dollars to european banks. this from the third quarter of 2010 shows a much different economy. back to you. melissa: interesting. thank you so much for the six a headline that generated all kinds of surprises. apple apologizing for it map app. the ceo tim cook says the company is doing everything it can to make maps better. you can use alternatives by downloading maps. what? melissa: that is crazy. that is like we have a problem with our signal, please go over to our competitor. lori: silence, i think says more. dennis: remember when they had the intended debacle. not admitting anything was wrong with it and people were getting more and more frustrated. lori: that is a good point. i think charlie gasparino is standing by with his latest report. inc. of america, i guess this is more interesting to charlie, at least. the bank with a 3.5 million in charges. bank of america says this is not an admission of guilt. the settlement was reached to eliminate the uncertainties. melissa: the latest news from bank of
question >> no, sir. no, sir. >> do you want a dead son-in- law, miss celie was recce keep advising him like you do. >> as the novel is based -- we are joined by the renowned author alice walker to further discuss the legacy. we will also speak about other writings, social and political activism in support of the palestinians and about the coming presidential election. alice walker, welcome to "democracy now!" it is great to be with you. yesterday your before a crowd of about 1200 people in the audience at the fall for the book festival in arlington, virginia. you read from "the color purple," and talked about its importance. tell us on this 30th anniversary this year, your thoughts about what brought you to write this work. >> i wanted to spend more time with my grandparents and they had died long ago. and my parents. so i set out to write a book in which i could literally live for year or two and be with them by creating characters who resembled them and by giving them a life they might have had, that in fact, many of them did not have. >> for especially young people who may not have
for doing the same work as men isn't just unfair, it hurts families. for the first law he signed was the lilly led better fair pay act to insure women are paid the same as men for doing the exact same work because president obama knows fairness for women means a stronger middle class for america. >> i'm barack obama and i approved this message. melissa: our own government said it is not quite as simple as that. we crunched numbers because some of it women often work fewer hours or within agent been with the same employer for a shorter period of time of time. how big of a problem. we have mary ann mash and jean borelli. author of backlash. thank you for joining us. we have seen this debate rage on over time. as you break down the numbers and as i watch these ads strikes me a lot of cases women have taken time off from work, not been within an employer as long or chosen jobs so they can work fewer hours and be perhaps the primary care provider at home. not that that is fair. not that that makes it any better but has a lot to do like exactly they're both doctors working in the same
spending, the country ached when they also announced 43 new laws they say will fix the economy, the people shrugged. no one really believes that will work, because spaniards aren't working-- that's the problem-- unemployment is rampant now over 25%. whilst the property crash that started the crisis is still festering. further austerity measures will simply suck more money out of the economy and threaten an even deeper recession. spain is trying to save a total of 40 billion from its budget which will hurt. it won't be as excruciately painful as a new round of cuts in greece. they are trying to save an extra 12 billion from a budget that has already been pared to the bone. no one is spared the pain greece not even the most vulnerable. disabled protestors took to the streets today pleading for their benefits not to be cut further. they can no longer even afford the medicine they need they say. >> sreenivasan: the greek government today came to basic agreement on $15 billion worth of cuts in spending over the next two years. the country needs to make the cuts if it wants to keep receiving bai
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 94 (some duplicates have been removed)